SMRP – SOAP: A Cost-Effective Method for Performing Criticality Analysis

When:
June 21, 2018 @ 9:00 am – 10:00 am
2018-06-21T09:00:00-07:00
2018-06-21T10:00:00-07:00
Where:
webinar

https://portal.smrp.org/eweb/DynamicPage.aspx?Site=SMRP&WebCode=EventDetail&evt_key=6e949a2a-e43d-4672-97ab-8a3c7d30bf73

By JD Solomon

Free for members / $35 non-members

This webinar provides an alternate method for conducting asset criticality ranking to what is traditionally proposed for use on facility and infrastructure assets, resulting in a time savings of up to 70% as compared to traditional methods. Traditional approaches typically involve processes that numerically score a combination or some variation of the consequence and likelihood of failure. In addition to being time consuming, traditional approaches can be misleading, filled with over-worked and counter-intuitive rigor, and in many cases just plain wrong. The webinar provides owners of infrastructure systems and infrastructure with a more efficient tool for performing criticality analysis. The most applicable times to apply this approach include:

  • When struggling to prioritize your maintenance program and related resources
  • When facing a major capital investment
  • When you need a structured, new way of evaluating old problems
  • When there is a change in leadership and a quick confirmation of the existing system is desired
  • When you simply do not have enough data to support anything beyond a subjective approximation 

Solomon and Oldach developed this innovative methodology over the course of 2014 and 2015, including its use on multiple sites in the eastern United States and its comparison with traditional approaches. A peer reviewed paper was presented at the international Reliability and Maintenance Symposium (RAMS) in January 2016 in Tucson, Arizona. The application has been successfully applied to major public infrastructure, industrial facilities and military applications. The proposed webinar will focus on an overview of the methodology plus findings and lessons learned from its expanded use over the past three years.